Monitoring the health of your application in production is a crucial aspect of software development because at any given point in time, you want to be reasonably certain about how your business critical application is performing and you want to be alerted to any problems that might be brewing up in the application before your customers do.

Many articles talk about the what of this style but in my view, not enough talk about the how. In this post, I am going to try and show one way to actually structure the solution to be more in line with the hexagonal ports and adapters style.

Seeing as micro-service architectures are all the rage these days, I decided to dip into it by building…

In a multi-tenant environment the application database is usually partitioned by tenants. This is done to achieve isolation and scalability. The problem of course is how do you route tenant requests to the correct databases?

In part 4, I detailed the way I went about creating application services for my expense tracking application. In this final post, I will talk about the ASP.NET Core MVC application that I built with HTML5/Razor front end views on top of the application services. Remember the application services consumption model sketch from the last […]

Having read Vaugh Vernon’s book on DDD implementation, I decided to portgrade (port+upgrade) my old clunky Windows based N-tier desktop expense tracking application to ASP.NET Core MVC application using some of the Domain Driven Design concepts I studied in the book.

It took trawling through dozens of blogs, MSDN help forums, git repo wikis and little bit of creative thinking to finally get the CI/CD pipeline working smoothly along with test reports showing in the build summary.