Strangler pattern is a way of migrating from legacy applications to new ones with both being operational at the same time and the upgrade happening behind the scenes gradually.

The way logging and instrumentation in code has traditionally been done is something like the below, say, I want to profile my application service method called “PeriodCloseReportAsync()” that gets called from my MVC controller action: This can be ok to a certain extent as long as the application is simple enough and you only intend […]

In this post I will show one way to mix JWT Token authentication with cookie authentication using ASP.NET Core and send out the JWT in a response cookie.

In a multi-tenant environment the application database is usually partitioned by tenants. This is done to achieve isolation and scalability. The problem of course is how do you route tenant requests to the correct databases?

In part 2, I talked about my domain modeling thought process so this post is about trying to persist those objects for long term storage. Although the avenue for different data storage provider is always open with the kind of design I will talk about here, my default data store tends to be SQL Server […]

In part 4, I detailed the way I went about creating application services for my expense tracking application. In this final post, I will talk about the ASP.NET Core MVC application that I built with HTML5/Razor front end views on top of the application services. Remember the application services consumption model sketch from the last […]

Application services can be loosely compared with the business logic layer of the yesteryear with one key difference, application services don’t actually contain any business logic neither they enforce any business logic.